Question: Is It I Was Or I Were?

Why do we say if I were?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations.

This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you).

In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be..

Which is or that is?

The clause that comes after the word “which” or “that” is the determining factor in deciding which one to use. If the clause is absolutely pertinent to the meaning of the sentence, you use “that.” If you could drop the clause and leave the meaning of the sentence intact, use “which.”

Is if she were correct grammar?

“If she was” is past tense, indicative mood. It describes something that happened or may have happened in the past. … “If she were” is present tense, subjunctive mood. It describes a hypothetical situation that is not true.

What is a defining clause?

A defining clause looks to the noun modified and singles it out among others that could exist in the context. A defining clause points a finger at the noun modified and says, “that noun, not any others named by that noun.” A defining clause begins with the relative pronoun that and is not set off by commas.

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

“I were” is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when you’re are talking about something that isn’t true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick… <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. "I was" is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

What to use with I Was or were?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they. There is a tip you might want to consider. Even though you are singular, you must use “were”.

Why do we use was with I?

We use “were” with you and they and we: it is the plural past form. But sometimes we can use “were” with I (he, she, it): I wish I were a sailor. … It is used to talk of “unreal” situations (that we wish were real).

Was or were in conditional sentences?

If the verb in the if clause is “to be,” use “were,” even if the subject of the clause is a third person singular subject (i.e., he, she, it). … See the examples below for an illustration of this exception: If I was a rich man, I would make more charitable donations.

Who is VS that is?

When you are determining whether you should use who or that, keep these simple guidelines in mind: Who is always used to refer to people. That is always used when you are talking about an object. That can also be used when you are talking about a class or type of person, such as a team.

Which used in grammar?

The battle over whether to use which or that is one many people struggle to get right. It’s a popular grammar question and most folks want a quick rule of thumb so they can get it right. Here it is: If the sentence doesn’t need the clause that the word in question is connecting, use which.

Is it correct to say if I were?

You use the phrase “if I were…” when you are using the subjunctive mood. The subjunctive is used to talk about hypothetical situations or things that are contrary to fact. … “If I were” is also used when you are wishing for something.

Was vs were in a sentence?

Singular and Plural Singular: I was, he was, she was, it was – BUT you were. (Just to make things more fun!) Plural: It’s always ‘were’, regardless of whether we’re talking about “they,” “we” or “you.” So far, so easy!